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to testify about the pentagon's response to the attack on ought consulate. he said the u.s. didn't have enough time to respond. he says it's not like you can pick up the phone and call 911. mike emanuel is on the hill. set the stage for us on this hearing. >> reporter: it's designed to address the concerns of south carolina senator lindsey graham who threatened to hold up the confirmation for chuck hagel, his successor. so what did the president know about the benghazi attack september 11, when did he know about it and what did he do about it? sources i talked to say panetta and others are carrying out the orders of the commander-in-chief. so what were they and how were they handled. expect fireworks. rick: later on this afternoon the president's nominee the head of the cia takes center stage. >> reporter: expect john brenner to get plenty of questions about the use of enhanced interrogation techniques during this time at cia. he left there in 2005. at the white house they are emphasizing brennan's experience. >> mr. brennan brings, i think, not on a vast amount of experience, but a sig
about drones is not that u.s. forces can kill people from the air using targeted so-called precision-guided missiles. u.s. forces have been killing people from the air for as long as we have had the capacity to put armed things in the air. what is novel about what our government is doing now in our day is not necessarily the technology. yes, we are using remote piloted aircraft versus traditionally piloted aircraft to launch these same missiles. but the type of aircraft, that is, the delivery system for the hellfire missile is not the new moral strategic legal thing that we are finding ourselves newly responsible for grappling with as citizens. it is not the technology by which u.s. forces are killing people which is knew in an important way. it's not the technology that's new. it is the circumstances. it is the circumstances of killing people away from where a war is being fought. if the u.s. was using a mix of helicopters and drones to fire hellfire missiles at insurgents who were fighting with u.s. troops in afghanistan right now, nobody would have a different ethical concern or a
house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overseas. and it talks about one set of circumstances. it looks like it is talking specifically about a particular country or type of country or certain type of leaders or terrorist organizations and under what conditions it would be ok to use this type of lethal force. it does not talk about drones per say, but it appears that is what they are referring to. if it does not rule out using its under other circumstances. it
to go. >> any member of al qaeda, a u.s. citizen or not, needs to know they have the ability to surrender anytime, anywhere throughout the world, and they can do so before their organization is to strike. we will destroy that organization, and u.s. citizens can surrender anytime. >> just on that point, i do not take a back seat to anybody in terms of citing al qaeda. i asked you a different question, and on the question of what kind of evidence ought to be applied, whether there ought to be geographic limits, the question of whether an individual should be allowed to surrender. for example, there is a question of whether the obligation changes, a valid target has not been publicly reported, so there are issues here, and i think we are going to have to continue discussions, and, madam, i look forward to the extra round. >> senator coats. >> i think it may be better held for further discussion next week in the classified room, but this whole idea of leaks, nothing upsets me more in this committee, and we have had a lot of these in the last few years, to see something that was d
much of the public and congress should know about the u.s. drove stride program. we would like to hear your opinion. what is the balance between government secrecy and the public's right to know? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online -- here is the headline in "the baltimore sun" this morning. brennan targeted over drones. looking at some of the opinions coming in on the editorial pages of the newspapers. "usa today" -- that is of the newspaper's editorial board opinion. jumping down, it says -- the opposing view that "usa today" publishes to give a counterpoint says end the u.s. -- covert drone war. naureen shah at columbia's human-rights institute writes -- she points out the war is waged secretly because the pakistani and yemen government have the time feared their citizens would oppose open u.s. and all -- involvement. what do you think? what is more important, government secrecy or the public's right to know? let's hear from walter from butler, indiana. a republican. are you with us? last time for walter. caller: yes, ma'am. hello? thank you for taking my cal
at sigtarp and was also at the u.s. securities and exchange commission who -- and served as counsel to mary schapiro and christopher cox. and investigative financial fraud, insider trading and other violations of securities law. she spent time as a litigator. her jd is from brigham young law school and she went to school here, old dominion university. the special inspector general from tarp and a recent report. treasury continues approving excessive -- excessive pay. on twitter -- is this all hindsight? guest: it is interesting. one of the things we constantly report on is things that should have been done better. you have to respect that a lot of decisions were made with a sense of urgency. but the compensation decisions were not. there was plenty of time to set up a good system for that. and even for the discount -- for the decisions that were made in a rush, it is really important we point out how things could have been done better. let's say we get and the situation where there is another crisis. and treasury and the regulators are running around with a sense of courtesy in an emergency
people familiar with the call, brennan stressed that the plot was never a threat to the u.s. public or air safety because washington had inside control over it. >> inside control of the plot, yeb, that's exactly right. >> so based on that one would know that we had something inside. is that a fair statement. >> from that statement, it is known that that ied at the time was not a threat to the traveling public because we had said publicly there was no active plot at the time of the bin laden anniversary. >> would you agree with me that that disclosure resulted in the outing of an asset that shouldn't have been outed? >> absolutely not, senator. i do not agree with you whatsoever. >> how do you say that? >> what i'm saying is we were explaining to the american public why that ied was not, in fact, a threat at the time that it was in the control of individuals. when we say positive control, inside control, that means we have that operation either environmentally or any number of ways. it did not in any way reveal any type of classified information. and i told those individuals to trans
headlines on the hill, another hearing focused on the u.s. consulate attack in libya that left a u.s. ambassador and three other americans dead. defense secretary will testify. >>> a team of top house democrats will unveil their gun control proposals. call for assault weapons ban and similar to what's in president obama's plan. and speaking of president obama, the president will meet with house democrats today. his second day selling his second term agenda to law makers in a retreat for democrats. they will gather in virginia. the president is trying to build support on issues ranging from the economy to immigration to guns. just days before his state of the union address. >> massive military budget cuts are taking their toll in a very high profile way. defense secretary has signed off on cutting the aircraft carrier fleet from 2 to 1. the move is creating havoc for families in norfolk, virginia. home to the uss harriet truman. now have deployments canceled. many already had given up apartment leases and cell phones but now scrambling to find back up plans. two aircraft carrier group
. meanwhile on tuesday, pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. discussed the issue of drone attacks saying strikes are indirect violation of international law and her events came at an event hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> i want to ask you about the drones. pakistan's position is that the drone strikes are a violation of your sovreignty and international law and i think under both of those guidelines you have the right to self-defense. and further, just to guide your answer, has pakistan threatened to shoot down drones, and if not, why not? the reason i ask this is because there is an understanding that while pakistan publicly opposes the strike, privately it sort of winks. >> let me address this as most people do to speak to what they can in terms of the question put and it's an important question and you do ask -- you ask a question which many ask, is there a quiet come policity in this. let me assure you, there is no question of quiet come policity or wink and nod. this is a parliamentary red line all government institutions have internalized as policy. and you know, i say this a
, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> hey, it's election eve. that story is coming up. >>> plus, robert gibbs is here for the interview after the proverbial bombshell he dropped on chris hayes' show yesterday on msnbc. >>> plus, fake t-shirts. shiny, spangly pretty t-shirts that are not real that are being faked in today's news. that's all ahead. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm singing the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! okay why? more is better than less because if stuff is not le-- if there is more less stuff then you might want to have some more and your parents just don't let you because there's only a little bit.
those strategic surprises, and to be the best analytic component within the u.s. government to do the analysis the cia has done so well for many, many years. at times the president asked and directs the cia to do covert action. that can take any number of forms to include paramilitary. as we have discussed here today on the counterterrorism front, there are things that the agency has been involved in since 9/11 that, in fact, have been a bit of an aberration from its traditional roam. one of the things i would do if i would go back to the agency is take a look at the allocation of mission within cia. the resources dedicated to this. and as we had the discussion when i paid my courtesy call, i am concerned that looking at the world, which is a very big place, we need to make sure we have the best intelligence collection capabilities possible and the best analytic capabilities possible and the cia shuz not be doing traditional military activities and operations. >> i appreciate that and look forward to working with you on this to really identify which is appropriately cia and dod. w
the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. within months of taking office released several olc memos describing the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. do you think it was appropriate that a different standard was applied to the release of the memos from the bush administration than those produced by the obama administration? >> i do not think there was a different standard. >> one was released within four months of the obama administration taking office. the other had been requested for a much longer time. >> i am not a lawyer. i have come to learn of the term sui generis. the olc memos released after the president came into office were released because the program was terminated. olc will counsel opinions, and those opinions were looked at in a different way because of the sui generis circumstances. >> both are essential for the ability of congress to carry its oversight responsibilities. finally, the intelligence reform act and terrorist prevention act of 2004, with which you are very familiar and which i
. >> a u.s. drone strike killed eight germans in pakistan today. do you have any information about that? >> i don't. and if i did, if i did, i wouldn't get into it. no. no. >> and other u.s. officials have confirmed these predator drone air strikes in pakistan. what is it about not confirming whether the president was consulted -- >> i'm not going to get into these matters. >> compromise organizational -- >> i'm not going to get into these matters. >> don't you think there is justifiable curiosity -- >> i think there are many things you should be justifiably curious about, but i'm not not going to get into talking about it. >> if other members of the government are confirming this, why are you not -- >> i'm not going to get into these matters. >> keep asking. there will be no answers. it was not just robert gibbs' problem. it turns out it is a problem of that job, no matter who has the job. >> reported a drone strike today along the border region. as you know, afghan and pakistani officials have been vocal about their concerns about them possibly killing civilians as opposed to terroris
the economy. we need to spend money to exist. in the u.s., you just cannot stop spending money. if you do, it will be the end of us. these people are haters. they are not going to change the way they think. thank god there are enough people in this country who think progressively. maybe we can turn this economy around and help america. have a nice day. host: robert brings up the sequestration. we will talk about that later with ray locker of "usa today." he will talk about the sequestration's effect on defense spending. that will be and about 25 minutes. we want to show you more of the president's speech four years ago and elkhart, indiana where he can each -- pitched his economic plan. he talks about the people who have lost their livelihood. [video clip]>> nearly 600,000 in the past month alone. when we say that this area has lost jobs faster than anywhere else in the united states of america, with an unemployment rate of over national security editor $1.2 trillion% when it was 4.7% just last year. we talk about layoffs in companies like keystone rv. companies that have sustained this
the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non- citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's knowledge of targeted strikes, and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actually, we received a short one and a long o
concern and u.s. officials were hard at work around the globe trying to prevent regional tensions and animosity from turning into full-scale wars and ominously, the united states was about to face an upsurge in terrorist attacks that would claim hundreds of american drives in lebanon including a 49-year-old cia officers named bob ames, killed during a brief visit to our embassy in beirut and who at the time was my boss at the cia. during my 25 year career at cia i watched up close and participated in history being made in far off corners of the world and cia fulfilled its critical intelligence role collecting intelligence, uncovering secrets, identifying threats, partnering with foreign intelligence and security services, analyzing complicated developments abroad and carrying out covert action and attempting to forecast events yet to happen, all in an effort to protect our people and to strengthen america's national security. and throughout my career, i had the great fortune to experience firsthand as well as to witness what it means to be a cia officer. such as an analyst who had
and detained with the u.s. support. >> i submit that the answer to that is one. he was put on a u.s. ship&interrogated for 30 days. thank you. >> thank you, mr. violence chairman. i want to point out that i'm going to try to enforce the eight minute. if you hear a tapping, it's not personal. senator rockefeller? >> thank you, madam chair, welcome mr. brennan, and if confirmed, you're going to lead an extraordinary agency with extraordinary people who perform extraordinary services, most of them totally unknown by the american people. most don't think about that. a life of public service and never having been known. those citizens with everything that we do to be known, and we get elected. it's very different in the central intelligence association and i respect it very much. i want to go to the eitc, that's tax credit, to the enhanced interrogation techniques. not the for the first. you talk about the 6,000 pages. what i want to say, an when the seconsecond round round comes, i will. dealing with the frustration of various administration, about trying to get information. why was it that t
crumbling of the soviet union. weapons of mass destruction were a concern and u.s. officials were hard at work around the globe trying to prevent regional tensions and an mos if is from turning in to full-scale wars and ominously, the united states about to face an upsurge in terrorist attacks to claim hundreds of american lives in lebanon including a 49-year-old cia officer named bob ames killed in a brief visit to our embassy in beirut and who at the time was my boss at cia. during my 25-year career at cia, i watched up close and participated in history being made in far off corners of the world. as cia fulfilled the critical intelligence roles, collecting intelligence, uncovering secrets, identifying threats, partnering with foreign intelligence and security agencies, carrying out covert action and attempting to forecast events yet to happen, all in an effort to protect our people and to strengthen america's national security. and throughout my career, i had the great fortune to experience firsthand and to witness what it means to be a cia officer. such as an analyst, who has t
to send u.s. troops and john brennan was an architect of that strategy. of course, controversial because there are innocent civilians who can get caught up in that as "the new york times" written about earlier this week, as well. that's obviously where some of this is coming from but the question americans face is would you rather have american troops and boots on the ground in yemen and pakistan or the unmanned drones taking on this responsibility? >> thank you very much. i appreciate you changing conversations in the middle of everything. we'll have plenty of time i'm sure to talk about chuck hagel. meantime, let's take the audience to the senate hearing and senator dianne feinstein. >> because of the added importance of having steady leadership at an organization that conducts most of its business outside of the public arena. intelligence is critical to the successful draw down in afghanistan, to the brutal war going on within's syria's borders, across north africa where the attacks of benghazi and hostage situation in algeria threaten to spread in to the next front of al qaeda and it
despite the substantial progress made against them still seek to carry out deadly strikes strikes. u.s. computer networks are under daily attack by nation states. international criminal organizations, sub national groups and individual hackers. and regimes in teheran and po pyongyang remain bent on delivery systems rather than fulfilling international obligations or even meeting the basic needs of their people. yes, the cia's mission as important to our nation's security today as any time in our nation's history. in carrying out the mission, the men and women of the cia frequently asked to undertake challenging, perilous and, yes, controversial actions on behalf of the american people. the cia is not immune from the scrutiny of the efforts and i welcome a discussion of cia's past and current activities. if i am confirmed one of the highest priorities would be the committ committee's lengthy report of interrogation with now banned interrogation techniques. i have read the findings and executive summary of the 6,000 page report which raises a number of very serious issues. given the grav
of targeted force for over a year, including the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non-citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. . but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's, but of targeted strikes and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actu
killing of u.s. citizens overseas. you might remember a memo was leaked earlier this week to "nbc news." those are the so-called white pages that were the catalyst for this broader conversation we've been having about drones. these secret documents we're talking about today released now to the intelligence committee are bigger than those white pages, more sought-after, if you will. congressman mike rogers is the chairman of that intelligence committee and he joins us now. congressman, have you gotten a look at these legal documents? >> i have. i read it this morning, jenna. jenna: anything you can tell us about them? i understand they're secret and classified but anything that stands out to you? >> you know, not really. it was, what i thought was a solid legal argument. you they the biggest thing here were they believe believe, that they should not have to show their everysight committee this particular document. that is what is stunning to me. i've gone through the legal document. we had the general memo back in june of last year. we've been asking for this legal argument for some tim
stewart is not surprised, take a look. >> the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop if they are to survive. >> the postal service hopes the cuts will help it save some $2 billion annually after losing nearly $16 billion last year. >> wow. i can't believe the business model of transporting letters with vehicles across the country for 40 cents a pop is failing. so where do you want me to take that, hawaii? no, no trouble, i'll put out a plane and get it there in two days. you got a quarter? yeah i'll do it for a quarter. yeah, [ bleep ] it, i'll just do it. >>> everybody's excited for the snow. poor bill has to work all day tomorrow. his son william's birthday. >> maybe you can replace me, go to his birthday party for me. >> i'll be happy to do that. how many inches in new york? >> i'm going for 6 to 8, weather service is going for 12. >> bundle up. still ahead, texts and e-mails are next. "morning joe" is now just moments away. officemax is celebrating our new collaboration with go daddy! with an online package including: domain name, website bu
/10 of the u.s. in the next 24 to 48 hours. we have an update on what forecasters say could be the biggest storm in decades for some 32 million americans. and there are new questions about whether the policies of the federal reserve may be quietly crushing the retirement funds for millions of american workers. we'll look at that. >> we want to bring up to speed of the massive manhunt, for an accused mass murderer. the police in riverside, california will brief the media on the status of their investigation of the murder of a riverside police officer and the shooting of another officer. we of course will bring you that press conference if and when it happens live and keep you updated throughout the program on the progress, if any in finding this suspect. meanwhile, a shocking new report on the federal reserve. and how its policies of affecting your retirement funds. are they crushing them for millions of american workers? we're learning several major u.s. companies are pouring cash into pension plans and battered by record low interest rates. among those ford motor company is expected to s
and center. waterboarding, however you define it, is no longer front and center because the u.s. has discontinued doing it. we talk about "zero dark thirty." >> 400 drone strikes. do we know, any idea, about civilian casualties within those? any concept? collateral damage? >> it wasn't the best part of mr. brennan's testimony yesterday, there has been significant collateral damage. the numbers are obviously -- whether it's hundreds or thousands -- the real question is, you've got to ask yourself on a cost benefit way, yes. at times innocents are going to be hurt. you've got to ask yourself don rumsfeld's questions. what you are accomplishing against terrorists, is that to some extent offset by the fact that you're alienating populations and governments with whom you have to work? that's the question we have to constantly ask ourselves, this cost benefits test. >> john, it's donny. if we got to the point and as i listen to mr. brennan, where we were going to do a drone strike against an american citizen, it would be the most desperate of times, and i don't want to have to go through a
type of u.s. counter-terrorism activities that involve the dropping of ordnance. whether it is a remotely piloted aircraft or man, we need to take that into account, but i would not agree with those statements because what we have found in many areas is that the people are being held hostage to outcry that in these areas and have welcomed the work that the government has done to rid them of the al qaeda cancer that exists. >> finally today, this committee received the olc memos justification, labo that, many of us who have been on the committee longer than i, have been seeking for some time, and i to have spent a large part of this morning reading them. yet the obama administration within months of taking office released several olc memos describing the legal justification for the treatment of terrorist detainees in u.s. custody. do you think it was appropriate that a different standard was applied to the release of the memos from the bush administration than those produced by the obama administration? >> i do not think there was a different standard. >> one was released
. rubio demanding answers for why the u.s. was not able to interrogate a suspect in the benghazi attacks, and he was briefly held by tunisia. take a listen to this. >> tunisians did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him. >> they did. >> where is he? we don't know. >> he's still in tunisia. >> that doesn't sound like a good system of working with our foreign partners. >> it shows the tunisians are working with their rule of law like we do. >> i know mr. rubio wants to sound ready for responsibility and if he's got some very strong testicles, but dismissing the rules and practices of a foreign nation, that's hardly the most mature way to approach international terrorism, is it? >> oh, martin, that's poppycock. come on. we should have been able to force the tunisian government to do exactly what we wanted them to do. >> we're not even in any kind of conflict with the tunisian -- >> i'm kidding, of course. while marco rubio was trying and similarly we saw this in the hearing with hillary clinton, he was trying very hard to show that he is in command of the facts
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

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